Resources

Managing Forests, Sustaining Lives, Improving Livelihoods

Managing Forests, Sustaining Lives, Improving Livelihoods

The main objective of the Learning Route is to analyse and disseminate the best practices and innovations in community-based Natural Resource Management carried out by indigenous peoples and ethnic communities of Lao PDR and Thailand, in order to promote their scaling-up at larger scale in the Mekong Region. In this framework, the Learning Route will focus particularly on community forestry management, its internal regulations and practices.

 

 

Welcome to the Learning Route: 

Managing Forests, Sustaining Lives, Improving Livelihoods of Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Groups in the Mekong Region

12-19  November 2012   

Lao PDR and Thailand

Throughout the world there are today over 370 million indigenous people living in some 90 countries. Asia hosts more than 70% (approximately with 231 million of individuals) of the world’s indigenous peoples, of which about 50% live under the poverty line.

1. However, despite their lack of monetary income, indigenous peoples and ethnic groups are not necessary poor in term of subsistence. Over time, they have developed highly diversified strategies to adapt to the conditions of their traditional territories. These practices can offer today appropriate solutions to deal with current challenges, such as those related to climate change, food security and land use. In this framework, the enhancement of tenure security – including security of communal tenure – can be regarded as a key tool to alleviate rural poverty and secure livelihoods (Andersen 2011)

2 . Furthermore, in the frame of the current initiatives for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD and REDD+), communal tenure can open up spaces for the development of climate change mitigation measures from which communities could benefit as main actors for the protection of carbon stock and/or the regeneration of degraded areas of the forests in which they live. However, although the recognition of the value of indigenous peoples’ environmental knowledge and practices in the conservation and management of natural resources has been growing during the past years, the role of indigenous peoples and ethnic groups in decision-making processes at national level still remains low. In the most of the Asian countries, indigenous peoples and ethic groups are still amongst the most marginalised sectors of the national society. To revert this situation, the dialogue between indigenous and ethnic communities, Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), governments and development institutions should be strengthened.

More info:     An Introduction to Land Tenure, Sustainable Livelihoods and Indigenous Peoples in Asia

In this context the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), PROCASUR Corporation and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) launch the Learning Route: Managing Forests, Sustaining Lives, Improving Livelihoods of Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Groups in the Mekong Region, with the purpose of sharing and scaling-up the best practices and innovations in indigenous community-based Natural Resource Management (NRM) in Lao PDR and Thailand among indigenous and local communities, their supporting organizations, public authorities and institutional partners. In this context, particular attention will be given to community forestry management regulations and practices, to the process of recognition of communal land titles over community lands and to alternative income-generating opportunities from natural resources.

At the same time, the Learning Route intends to increase awareness on the role of indigenous peoples and ethnic groups in the sustainable management of natural resources and promote their inclusion in policy making processes at national and regional level.

 

 

[jwplayer playlistid=”1184″]

 

Learning Route’s objectives

The main objective of the Learning Route is to analyse and disseminate the best practices and innovations in community-based Natural Resource Management carried out by indigenous peoples and ethnic communities of Lao PDR and Thailand, in order to promote their scaling-up at larger scale in the Mekong Region. In this framework, the Learning Route will focus particularly on community forestry management, its internal regulations and practices.

Specific objectives of the Learning Route are the followings:

  1. To identify best practices, innovative solutions and lessons learned in sustainable NRM and promote their dissemination and scaling-up at national and international level;
  2. To analyse sustainable community-forestry management and land use planning and their internals regulations in indigenous and ethnic communities, as efficient models to enhance food security, diversify livelihoods and promote income-generating activities for poor households;

  3. To recognize the interlinks between communities’ internal organizations and the management of community forestry areas, as well as the intimate relation between cultural, spiritual and environmental practices within indigenous contexts;

  4. To extract lessons on the main strategic steps taken by communities in the process of claiming their communal land titles, including cooperation and negotiations with local governmental authorities and partner institutions;

  5. To strengthen policy dialogue to promote the inclusion of indigenous peoples and ethnic groups in decision-making processes for the conservation and sustainable management of their traditional territories.

Host Experiences

A Learning Route is a continuous process of “training in the field” organized thematically around successful experiences and best practices on innovative rural and local development in which local actors themselves become trainers. Through workshops, interviews, conversations and other activities in the field, the Learning Route generates a space for individual and collective learning for visitors and hosts. 

Read the  Learning Route Call in English

 

 Agenda

 

 

Learning Route Schedule

Laos PDR- Kingdom of Thailand, 12- 19 November 2012

Date

Place

Time

Activity

Sunday 11/11/2012

Vientiane Capital, Laos PDR

Whole day

Arrival of LR participants and check in at the Hotel

Monday 12/11/2012

Vientiane Capital, Laos PDR

10:30 – 12:00

Opening of the Learning Route, presentation of participants and of the LR at Lao Women Union

12:00 – 13:30

Lunch

13:30 – 15:30

Preparation of the Experience Fair

15:30 – 17:00

Experience Fair

19:00

Welcome dinner

Tuesday 13/11/2012

Vientiane Capital

07:00 – 08:00

Breakfast and hotel check out

08:30 – 9:00

UN House, Registration of Participants

09:00 -10:15

Introduction to Laos PDR, Panel session

10:15 – 10:30

Tea break

10:30 – 12:00

Introduction to Laos PDR

12:00 – 13:00

Lunch

13:00 – 15:30

Travel to Sangthong District

 

Sangthong District

CASE ONE: Bamboo Forestry Management and Communal Land Titles in Sanghtong District
15:30 – 16:30 Meeting with Sangthong District Government
16:30 – 17:30

Travel to Huayhang village

 

17:30 – 17:45

Community Reception

18:00 – 19:00

Welcome dinner

 

19:00 – 21:00

 

Cultural night

 

21:00 –21:30

Travel to Napor village and accommodation for the night

Wednesday 14/11/2012

Sangthong District

 

07:00 – 07:45

Breakfast

07:45 -08:15

 

Visit to Bamboo Handicraft Production in Napor village

 

08:15 -08:45

Travel to Huayhang village

08:45- 09:45

Presentation by community representatives: Huayhang experience in bamboo forestry management and communal land titles

09:45 – 11:30

 

Visit to the Communal Land (Bamboo Forestry Area)

 

11:30 – 12:00

 

Visit to the Mekong Conservation Area

 

12:00 – 13:00

Lunch

13:00 – 13:30

Products from the forest, visit to the banana fibre and bamboo handicraft production

 

13:30 – 14:15

 

Presentation of the Women’s Saving Groups

 

14.15 – 15:30

Time to rest

15:30 – 18:30 Basi Ceremony and dinner

18:30 – 20:00

Travel back to Vientiane and check in at the hotel

Thursday 15/11/2011

Vientiane Capital

08:00 -09:00

Breakfast

09:00- 09:30

UN House, registration of participants

CASE TWO: Gender and Development Association (GDA)

09:30- 12:00

 

Panel session, GDA
12:00 – 13:30

Lunch

13:30 – 15:00

 

Workshop Analysis

 

15:00 – 15:15

Tea break

15:15- 16:45

 

Introduction to the Innovation Plans

 

16:45 – 17:00

 

Wrap up of the day
18:00

Dinner

Friday 16/11/2012

Vientiane capital

Morning

Hotel Check out and travel to the airport

Chiang Mai, Thailand

Travel to Chiang Mai and check in at the hotel

16:00 – 18:00

 

Working on the Innovation Plans

18:00

Dinner

Saturday 17/11/2012

Chiang Mai

08:00 – 09:00

Breakfast

9:00 – 10:15 Introduction to Thailand, Panel session

10:15 – 10:30

Tea break

10:30 – 12:00

 

Introduction to Thailand

 

12:00- 13:30

Lunch

13:30 – 16:00

 

Travel to Huay Hin Lad Nai village

Chiang Rai Province

CASE THREE: Shifting cultivation as a self-sufficient system in Huay Hin Lad Nai

16:00 – 16:15

Welcome speech and village’s rules by the community

16:15 – 17:30

Cultural reception: sword dance, traditional songs and music

17:30 – 18:30

Presentation: Lessons Learned from advocacy for our land rights

18:30 – 20:00

Dinner with products from the shifting cultivation fields explained by the women

20:00

 

Accommodation of participants to their host houses

Sunday 18/11/2012

Chiang Rai Province

07:00 – 08:00

Breakfast

08:00 – 10:00

 

Field visit: Learning trek on the way to the shifting cultivation fields. Thematic learning stops in the forest

10:00 – 12:00

 

Understanding Shifting Cultivation

Explanation of the process, socio-cultural component and practical demonstration

 

12:00 – 13:30

Lunch in the field (talking about food security)

13:30 – 14:30

 

Walking back to the village

 

14:30 – 16:00

Time to rest

16:00 – 17:30

Workshop Analysis

17:30 – 19:30

Travel back to Chiang Mai

Chiang Mai

19:30 – 20:00

Check in and installation at the Hotel

20:00

Dinner

Monday 19/11/2012

Chiang Mai

07:30 – 09:00

Breakfast

CASE FOUR: Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP)

09:00 – 10:15

Panel session, AIPP

10:15 – 10:30

 

Tea break

 

10:30 – 12:00

 

Roundtable discussion and open floor debate

 

12:00 – 13:00

Lunch

13:00 – 15:00

 

Working at the Innovation Plans

 

15:15 – 15: 30

Tea break

15:30 – 18:00

Presentation of the Innovation Plans

 

18:00 – 19:00

Closing meeting

19:00 – 21:00

Delivery of certificates and Cloture of the Learning Route/ Dinner

 

 

 

 

Download the Map of the Route

 

 

COUNTRY: THAILAND
Mr/Ms Family Name First Name Organization

Mr

Chupinit

Kesmanee

Interpreter

Ms

Laba

Wadsana

Indigenous Women Network of Thailand

Mr.

Bandit Wetchakit

Community representative of Hua Hin Lad Nai

Mr

Bunyuenkul

Manop

Akha Network Committee

Ms

Piamsaart

Khamnueng

MOAC, Senior Policy Analyst

Ms

Petsri

Supawan

MOAC, Policy Analyst

Ms

Maneepitak

Sumana

MOAC, Policy Analyst

COUNTRY: LAO PDR
Mr/Ms Family Name First Name Organization

Ms

Keodouangdy Hone Ethnic Liaison and CBNRM Officer – Community Forestry Project

Mr

Kounlavong

Khamman 

Huay Hang Village

Mr

Vue

Sai

CAMKID staff

Mr.

Luangbounheuang

Shantiphab

Interpreter

Mr

Phonekeo

Soulichanh

RLIP Project Director, IFAD

Mr

Phonsavath

 

Koumphan

SSSJ Programme, IFAD

Mr

 

KHAM

SSSJ Programme, IFAD

Ms

Vongkhamphai

Toun

D-CAW Santhong

Ms

Sonebaikham

Sompong

LWU Santongh

COUNTRY: CAMBODIA
Mr/Ms Family Name First Name Organization

Mr

Van thoeun

Chheng

Indigenous Community Support Organization

Ms

Yun

Mane

Cambodia Indigenous Youth Association (CIYA)

COUNTRY: MYANMAR
Mr/Ms Family Name First Name Organization

Mr

B la dol Maung Interpreter
Mr Lin Han SPECTRUM
Ms Laura Naw SPECTRUM

Ms

Shang hkawng

Ja gu

Ministry of Border Affairs

Ms

Khin

Yu

Za na (middle name)

Ministry of Border Affairs

Mr

Aung

Htet

Ministry of Border Affairs

ORGANIZERS
Mr/Ms Family Name First Name Organization

Mr

HALPERN

ARIEL

PROCASUR Corporation

(Chile)

Ms

PEDONE

GIULIA

PROCASUR Corporation

(Italy)

Mr

NURI SHERPA

LAKPA

AIPP (Nepal)

Mr

SHIMRAY

GAM

AIPP (India)

Ms

Lungharwo

Thingreiphi

AIPP (India)

Mr

Hean

Bunhieng

AIPP (Cambodia)

Ms

YONGCHIALORSAUTOUKY

SOUKNIDA

GDA (Laos)

Mr

 

OULATHONG

GDA (Laos)

Mr

PRASAD

EKLAVYA

Photographer (India)

 

1. The experience of Huay Hang and Napor Villages

Learning from the experience of Huay Hang and Napor in bamboo forestry management and Communal Land Titles The experience of Huay Hang and Napor villages is a successful example of the

blending of traditional local knowledge and practices with the requirements of contemporary markets as a strategy to improve local livelihoods. Villagers coming from Luang Prabang province, in fact, counted with a long tradition of bamboo forestry management and bamboo handicraft production. Civil Society Organizations and local Government were able to recognize and build upon this existing potential to create more stable conditions for the development of newincome generating activities for foodinsecure households, while at the same time preserving the natural environment.

Indeed, this is a promising activity showing high potential to establish sustainable partnerships between the public and private sector, and hence, to generate market access for the artisans. In this way, foodinsecure households can be enabled to improve their livelihoods by capitalizing on new market opportunities.

In the light of the above, this experience offers the opportunity to learn on:

1. Good practices in land use planning and bamboo forestry management systems;

2. Good practices in group creation and organization for community forestry management;

3. Strategies to access new markets through value-chain approach, with a specific focus on women;

4. Strategies for the creation of enabling environments at institutional level for the promotion of new income-generating activities based on natural resources;

5. Lessons learned on communal land titling process, challenges and opportunities.  

Read the case study report: Huay Hang

 

2. The Gender and Development Group

The Gender and Development Group (GDG), formerly the Women in Development (WID)network, was formed in 1991. A collaboration of the Lao Women’s Union (LWU), UNICEF, with International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs), the WID network focused on women and gender development issues in Lao PDR.

In 1996 the name of WID changed to the “Gender and Development Group (GDG)” in order to more accurately reflect the goals of the network.  This includes focusing on both womenand men in the area of development.

The new network required that an international organization provided GDG with an umbrella partnership to guide its development. This role has been undertaken by: World Education – from 1996 to 2000; CUSO Lao PDR –from 2000 to 2005 – and Concern Worldwide from 2000 until now.

Vision

GDG wants to contribute to a society where women are empowered and can live in society without violence and discrimination. Therefore, GDG wants to achieve that women can work along with men to reduce poverty and benefit from opportunities for development.

Mission

GDG will work for more joint action, information, knowledge and expertise on gender mainstreaming and gender based discrimination.

Target group

The main target groups of GDG are INGOs and NGOs staff. Each partner selects one of its Lao staffs to participate in GDG meetings and activities. Participation is not limited to women. GDG encourages both women and men to participate and exchange lessons.

Website:  Gender and Development Association

 

 

1. The experience of Huay Hin Lad Nai

Sustainable solutions for self- sufficient people”, shifting cultivation as an integrated and self-sufficient system. 


Huay Hin Lad Nai considers its long-term practice of shifting cultivation as a sustainable and self-sufficient model to ensure food security. Being deeply embedded into the cultural context, it is also crucial for the protection and transmission of the local spiritual and cultural patrimony. The active inter-generational exchange at village level ensure that this bulk of knowledge and practices are transmitted from elders to youth.

In the course of the last years, the village has become a “learning centre” for those people that want to improve knowledge and skills in the sustainable management of forest resources. As Huay Hin Lad Nai representatives affirm “we offer sustainable solutions for self-sufficient people”.

In the light of the above, this experience offers the opportunity to learn on:

1. Sustainable strategies for self-sufficiency, including diversification of local products and access to market;

2. The intimate connection between environmental, social, spiritual and cultural practices as key for sustainability;

3. Community self-organization and mobilization, lessons learned in policy dialogue with local government for the recognition of community rights over land and natural resources.

Read the case study report: Huay Hin Lad Nai

 

2. Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact 
Strengthening solidarity and empowering indigenous peoples

The Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) is a regional organization founded in 1988 by indigenous peoples’ movements. AIPP is committed to the cause of promoting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights and human rights and articulating issues of relevance to indigenous peoples. At present, AIPP has 46 members from 14 countries in Asia with 11 indigenous peoples’ national alliances/networks and 35 local and sub-national organizations. Of this, 16 are ethnic based organizations, 5 are indigenous women‘s organizations and 4 are indigenous youth organizations.

GOALS

  1. To empower indigenous peoples in Asia to promote and defend their human rights and fundamental freedoms and claim legal recognition to their identities, collective rights under UNDRIP and other international human rights instruments.
  2. To build the broadest solidarity and cooperation of indigenous peoples in Asia to strengthen indigenous movements.
  3. To promote and protect the integrity of nature and the environment and enhance the sustainable resource management systems of indigenous peoples including their traditional knowledge, food sovereignty and biodiversity by having full control over their land, territories and resources.
  4. To attain full and effective participation and representation of indigenous peoples, particularly indigenous women and youth at all levels of decision-making.
  5. To strengthen solidarity and cooperation with other social movements towards achieving equity, equality, peace, democracy and justice. 

 

Additional documentation: Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact

Webpages:

 

Innovation Plan

1. Experience Fair

2. The idea of Innovation

 

 

 

 

 

ประกาศรับสมัคร

เส้นทางการเรียนรู้

การจัดการป่า ชีวิตยั่งยืน การปรับปรุงวิถีชีวิตของชนเผ่าพื้นเมืองและกลุ่มชาติพันธุ์ในภูมิภาคลุ่มน้ำโขง

สปป. ลาวและประเทศไทย ๑๒ – ๑๙ พฤศจิกายน ๒๕๕๕

 

 

Click on the following link to download the documents on the Learning Route Languages:

Docs in Thai, Lao, Kmer, Burmese 

 

Learn more

Related Portfolio